This ONE thing has been the key to every major event in my career

A little while back, I shot two segments for First Coast News television station in Jacksonville, Florida. I didn’t have to pitch myself for these, they just call me up anytime they have a story with a sports business angle.

But it wasn’t always that way. In fact, it’s been 10 years since the first time I pitched myself for a sports business segment on television. Since then, I have been on dozens of local stations across the country and multiple national TV shows, including my two-year term as ESPN’s sole sports business reporter.

But let’s talk about how you get started, how you become that go-to expert that TV reporters and producers call on for stories.

I was recently on a panel at University of North of Florida talking about careers in PR. One of the questions we were asked was about something we would suggest all students do. My answer was that they should never be afraid to send an email.

I owe virtually every major thing that has happened in my career to sending an email.

I landed at my dream law firm as a first-year attorney because of an email I initially sent to a partner before I ever even had an interview.

I landed my book deal because of an email I sent to an editor.

I landed my agent because of an email I sent after I saw an agent follow me on Twitter.

I landed my husband because he was a producer of a radio show and I emailed him to pitch myself as a guest (obviously, that one is a longer story, haha).

I landed my first television segments through an email.

I landed my contributing role at Forbes at 26 through an email.

Honestly, I could write an entire book on the emails that have changed my life. In fact, maybe I should!

But whatever it is that you want and terms of publicity, it’s probably going to start with an email. If you want to become that go-to expert on TV, you’re going to have to send emails to producers and suggest commentary that relates to news stories currently trending, and you’re going to have to position yourself as the right person to discuss those stories.

I had no idea how to write a pitch when I sent my first one to a television station. I’ve gone back and read it now, years later, and it makes me cringe. I certainly write far better pitches now! But, you know what? I not only landed a television segment with that first cringe-worthy email, I ended up with a weekly segment.

So, the most important thing is simply being willing to send the email.

Who feels like they’re ready for TV? Comment below and let’s talk about how you’re going to get there.

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